Talca Bottling Plant – Lines, Textures, Shapes, Forms

Talca, #3. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #3. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Today, Valentine’s Day, we were treated to a tour of the Talca “embotelladora”, or bottling plant, in Godoy Cruz, Mendoza, Argentina.

¡Gracias, Anna Clara!

Talca (Oeste Embotelladora, S.A.) takes great pride in producing a “national” product. That is, an Argentine company, with Argentine owners and employees, making soda from Argentine ingredients, all for an Argentine market. (Unlike the giant multi-nationals like Pepsi and Coke.) 

It is quite an operation–and what a wonderful place to discover black and white industrial/abstract compositions!

One of the too cool vehicles belonging to the owner, the “Panda truck”:

Talca, #1. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #1. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Soda pop has just gotta have gas:

Talca, #5. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #5. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Un “charco artístico“:

Talca, #8. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #8. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Stacks and stacks and stacks:

Talca, #9. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #9. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Bottles and bottles and bottles:

Talca, #12. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #12. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

I liked this particular abstract, formed by towers of plastic-wrapped packing material and the anti-hailstone fabric above:

Talca, #13. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #13. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

The Talca brand…in this region, only Coca Cola gives it much competition:

Talca, #14. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #14. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Another of my favorite images from this day. It definitely has that industrial look:

Talca, #15. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #15. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

For more images from the “Talca Tour”, please…

 

Some of the sophisticated machinery behind your Talca soda pop:

Talca, #16. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #16. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Another piece of useful, practical, and necessary equipment–this one a bit simpler than the previous example:

Talca, #17. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #17. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Water storage tanks:

Talca, #18. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #18. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Anna Clara, our tour guide (on the right), shows María Rosa what the two-liter plastic bottles look like before they are heated and formed (“blown out”) by the machine into actual soda bottles:

Talca, #19. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #19. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

An abstract view of a box of bottle material:

Talca, #20. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #20. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

The labeling machine whirs along at warp speed. I left a little color in there to help with understanding the flow. In general, I am not a big fan of selective color, but for a bog post, what the heck:

Talca, #21. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #21. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

The controls on one of the machines:

Talca, #22. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #22. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

The soda goes in and the cap goes on in another whirling dance:

Talca, #23. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #23. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

The back-lighting helps check for potential impurities:

Talca, #24. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #24. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

Another industrial view:

Talca, #27. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #27. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

You can’t have huge quantities of soda pop without huge barrels of syrup:

Talca, #28. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #28. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

And huge quantities of sugar are critical as well:

Talca, #29. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #29. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

The spare parts room keeps the machinery running:

Talca, #30. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #30. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

More spare parts organization…nuts, bolts, and screws, in this case:

Talca, #31. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #31. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

 

One last industrial abstract–pallets of plastic-wrapped cans standing by for the labeling and filling lines:

Talca, #32. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017
Talca, #32. Mendoza, Argentina, 2017

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